wolfcop1The answer is yes. This film is just as awesome as you’re hoping.

I mentioned in an earlier post that my favorite Horror films are the ones involving monsters. Well my favorite monster films are those involving werewolves. I’ve done my best to see every werewolf movie ever made (I’m sure I’ve missed a few, but not many) and I can say with the unsubstantiated authority which I grant myself that most of them are just terrible. The werewolf seems to be the most neglected monster when it comes to well-crafted, reasonably ambitious film-making. They are, however, the go-to for slackers, smut-peddlers, and those hoping to capitalize on the teenyboppers that have had a stranglehold on the film industry since the eighties (this was fine when we were the teenagers, but it’s no longer a good thing). The Howling I and IV are my favorite werewolf films, and American werewolf in London, Silver Bullet, and Bad Moon follow, though not always in that order. To me The Howling set a bar that no one has really attempted to raise (not even the Howling sequels, except IV, which is essentially the same as the first one). I’ve waited years for a werewolf film that took the sub-genre seriously and gave the werewolf its well-deserved introduction into the modern age.

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Of course, Wolfcop is NOT that film–but it is a thing of beauty all to itself.

Officer Lou Garou (Leo Fafard) is a jaded cop who spends his days turning a blind eye to crime in favor of a flask and a cute bartender named Jessica (Sarah Lind). He’s a drunk and a drain on the department, and it’s hard to tell why he still has a job. Things change for Garou (or maybe it’s just his luck?) when he is sent into the forest on a noise complaint and gets jumped by a group of people in masks. He wakes up in his bed the following morning with no clue how he got there. He receives his first sign that something is amiss when he attempts to shave and his facial hair immediately grows back. Then there’s the bloody pentagram carved into his chest. Figuring he’s had stranger Tuesdays, he heads to work to find that the only candidate running for mayor against Mayor Bradley (Corinne Conley) has been found dead in the forest with a syringe in his arm and what looks like bites taken out of his throat. While on scene, Garou begins to have flashbacks to the night before, and brief glimpses of a dark ritual involving himself pass before his mind’s eye.

Cue the lovable, gun-toting hillbilly who believes in werewolves, a bloody transformation scene in the bathroom of a bar, and a town full of crimes no longer overlooked by this new (improved?) Lou Garou, and you have yourself a fun ride. No one is getting an Oscar for this one, but Horror fans who don’t mind a little “cheese” with their cornbread should be able to appreciate this film.

wolfcop3I know what you’re thinking: But once I watch Wolfcop there won’t be any more Wolfcop to watch!

Fear not–the sequel has been confirmed.

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