The Quiet Ones

It was okay.

That’s the general consensus, and I have to agree. It’s well written. Well acted. The cinematography is great, and it fosters a hazy, Gothic atmosphere that nearly distracted me from the fact that nothing was happening.

Nearly.

I actually kept saying as I watched it, “This is pretty good, even though nothing’s really happening,” and, “I kinda like this, although I’m not sure why yet.” It was as if I were being shown a haunted house, perched upon a hill, near a dark forest, in the shadowy corner of a quaint little town, cast in the vague glow of a late October afternoon; but when I opened the door and inspected the interior of the house, the furniture was well arranged and clean, and the art on the walls had been purchased on sale from the nearest Target, and every possible shadow had been quelled by stark, electric lighting. What, no cobwebs or creaking floorboards? Not even a locked door of mystery beyond which could be heard the distant cry of a tortured soul?

The story centers around a couple of eager college students, a coo coo professor who believes that demon possession amounts to psychic manifestation, and a quiet, timid camera man who simply wants to “film everything.” A young girl who suffers from an affliction with the symptoms of demon possession is under the doctor’s care. Trusting that he has her best interests in mind, she allows the doctor to perform psychological experiments on her, attempting to goad the entity she has manifested (named Evey) out of her mind and into the body of a plastic doll. The film follows these experiments over a period of time, during which they come closer and closer to extracting Evey, but she remains just out of reach. Accidents begin to happen, as Evey presumably fights back. The characters go back and forth, drawing out the central debate offered by the film: are demons real or a product of a strained psyche? Is Evey the ghost of someone who died in the house? Is that just the name this sick girl has provided for the demon who inhabits her? Or is it simply some trauma from the girl’s own life, manifested into a malignant force by her own inability to cope?

You’ll have to watch to find out. I’m giving this one a 3 because despite the fact it doesn’t say anything new, it is well written, well acted and well shot.

Rating: 3 out of 5

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